Health News
Women's Health Care of New England

Women with insomnia or other sleep problems have an increased risk of giving birth prematurely, a new study suggests.

The observational study, in Obstetrics & Gynecology, included 2,172 women with a sleep disorder who gave birth between 2007 and 2012 to single children after 22 to 44 weeks of gestation. They were matched with the same number of women with the identical ethnic, health and behavioral characteristics, but who did not have a sleep disorder.

Read more:https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/08/well/family/sleep-problems-in-pregnancy-tied-to-premature-births.html

University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

Women with obesity are more likely to get breast cancer, and a number of studies have provided a reasonable explanation why: after menopause, fat tissue manufactures estrogen, and the estrogen then promotes tumor growth. But why, then, do women with obesity continue to have more aggressive tumors even after anti-estrogen treatment? Once the tumor's source of estrogen is removed, obesity should have no effect on prognosis, but it does.

Read more: https://www.eurekalert.org/

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month. Cervical cancer screening is used to find changes in the cells of the cervix that could lead to cancer. Screening includes the Pap test and, for some women, testing for human papillomavirus (HPV). Cervical cancer screening is important because it usually takes three to seven years for high-grade cervical changes to become cancer.
Regular screening gives patients and ob-gyns time to find cervical cell changes and discuss possible treatment before the cell changes become cancer.

For guidelines on when and how often to screen, read the Cervical Cancer Screening FAQ.

“It varies based on the company,” said Sara Haas, a dietitian speaking on behalf of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “I encourage people to be label readers.”

Vegans and others may prefer to drink plant-based milks over milk that comes from animals for a variety of reasons. But in terms of nutritional content, a recent study in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition confirmed that plant-based beverages vary widely in their nutritional profiles, and the authors recommended that young children drink cow’s milk unless there is a medical reason they cannot.

Read more: http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/11/11/which-milk-is-most-nutritious-soy-cashew-almond-or-coconut

The same marketing techniques used to convince children to eat junk food are highly effective in promoting fruits and vegetables, a new study has found.

Researchers assigned 10 elementary schools to one of four groups. In the first, they posted vinyl banners around the salad bar depicting cartoon vegetable characters with “super powers.” In the second, they showed television cartoons of the characters. The third got both cartoons and banners, and a control group got no intervention. The study, in Pediatrics, went on for six weeks in 2013.

 

Read Morehttp://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/07/05/how-to-sell-kids-on-vegetables

An outbreak of the Zika virus in the continental United States could begin any day now. But while there is plenty of discussion about mosquito bites, some researchers are beginning to worry more about the other known transmission route: sex.

Intimate contact may account for more Zika infections than previously suspected, these experts say.

The evidence is still emerging, and recent findings are hotly disputed. All experts agree that mosquitoes are the epidemic’s main driver.

But two reports now suggest that women in Latin America are much more likely to be infected than men, although both are presumed to be equally exposed to mosquitoes.

 

Read More:http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/05/health/zika-virus-sex-spread.

A weekly routine of yoga and meditation may strengthen thinking skills and help to stave off aging-related mental decline, according to a new study of older adults with early signs of memory problems.

Most of us past the age of 40 are aware that our minds and, in particular, memories begin to sputter as the years pass. Familiar names and words no longer spring readily to mind, and car keys acquire the power to teleport into jacket pockets where we could not possibly have left them.

Read More:http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/06/01/yoga-may-be-good-for-the-brain

When I had my children I felt that there was a tendency by experts, including those in my own pediatric profession, to push certain principles that took all the fun out of life. This played out for me, in particular, after I gave birth to my first child, and was told as part of my breast-feeding “support” that I should avoid all spicy foods, because they would upset the baby. Like any good Cambridge, Mass., mother, I turned this into an argument about multiculturalism (“What about the mothers in Sichuan?”), but what I really thought was that it harked back to some old ideas about spices heating up the blood, and generally making life too interesting for the nursing mother.

 

Read More:http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/03/28/how-breast-feeding-can-broaden-a-childs-diet

I got my good sleeper second. My oldest child, my first darling baby, did not reliably sleep through the night till he was well past 2. Since he is now an adult, I can skip right over all the questions of whether we could have trained him to self-soothe and stop calling for us in the night — we tried; we failed; we eventually gave up.

The good sleeper was a good sleeper right from the beginning. She followed the timeline in the books, slept longer and longer between feedings, till she was reliably giving us a real night while she was still an infant and she never looked back. Had we matured as parents, become less anxious, more willing to let her learn how to soothe herself? Were our lives calmer? Well, no. In fact, kind of the opposite. We just got dealt two very different babies.

 

Read More: http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/03/14/some-babies-are-just-easier-than-others/?rref=health&module=Ribbon&version=context&region=Header&action=click&contentCollection=Health&pgtype=Blogs

Page 1 of 4

Women's Health Care of New England

Women's Healthcare of New England

Devoted to women. Committed to excellence.

Women’s Health Care of New England has provided women of Fairfield County quality, state of the art, compassionate care since 1990. We are part of a broader network of OB/GYN physicians that comprise Women’s Health Connecticut, offering additional guidance and resources.

Please bring personal identification, insurance card and any co-payments to your appointment.

Locations

  • Main Building:

    761 Main Ave.
    Building B, Suite 100
    Norwalk, CT 06856

    203-644-1100
    203-644-1199 FAX

    Satellite Offices:

    30 Stevens Street
    Suite I
    Norwalk, CT 06856
    203-644-1160

    Westport Center for Health
    323 Riverside Ave.
    Westport, CT
    203-349-4305

    Ridgefield Health & Wellness Center
    109 Danbury Rd. (adjacent to the Kohl's parking lot)
    Ridgefield, CT 06877

    View Map

Office Hours

Monday:
9am-5pm
Tuesday:
8am-5pm
Wednesday:
8am-5pm
Thursday:
8am-6:30pm
Friday:
8am-4pm
Saturday:
Closed
By Appointment Only

AIUMASF